Most Haunted Capesthorne Hall

Capesthorne Hall

Capesthorne has been touched by nearly 1,000 years of English History.

Roman Legions passed across it. Titled Norman families hunted on it. In the Civil War the family was Royalist and an ancestress helped Charles II to escape after the Battle of Worcester.

The Hall itself was built between 1719 and 1732. Extensive changes over a hundred years later, included the distinctive turrets and pinnacles. But in 1861 a disasterous fire threatened to destroy the Hall completely. It was only saved by a change of the direction of the wind, which left just two wings remaining. The entire central section was gutted and had to be completely rebuilt. During the Second World War, Capesthorne was used as a Red Cross Hospital and its cellars became an effective bomb shelter for nurses and soldiers.

The historic collection displays a family’s taste collected over three centuries and include fine art, marble sculptures, tapestries, Regency, Jacobean and Rococo antiques from throughout Europe and America and the Far East.

The present Squire, Sir William Bromley-Davenport, former  Lord Lieutenant of Cheshire and his American wife Elizabeth (E.B Watts), a professional artist, are the latest of eight generations to live there.

Capesthorne Hall is haunted by a number of ghostly figures, including that of a ‘Gray Lady’. She has been seen by many witnesses, particularly in the west wing.

Perhaps more frightening than the phantom female in gray is the appearance of a group of ghostly shapes walking down the stairs into the chapel vault. No explanation has been found for either of these manifestations.

The sinister spirit of a disembodied arm appeared to a young member of the family while he was sleeping in his bed. He was disturbed from his sleep by the sound of someone knocking on his window and as he looked up, all he could see was an arm trying to open it. As soon as the boy reached the window, the arm disappeared without a trace.

First broadcast : 6th February 2010

 

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